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Pre-Function Area Level 3

Official AddressDay 1 Opening School Live Performance

Plenary: Grand Ballroom Level 3

Official AddressOfficial Welcome to Country

Plenary: Grand Ballroom Level 3

Official AddressOfficial Conference Opening & Welcome

Plenary: Grand Ballroom Level 3

keynoteProfessor Michael Fullan
Keynote Session

Plenary: Grand Ballroom Level 3

Nuance: exploit upward, liberate downward, verticalize and laterize everywhere

The keynote will make the point that the context is increasingly problematic. The first response consists of how to address Coherence. A framework for ‘coherence’ will be presented that enable leaders to act in the direction of continuous coherence-making.

The second point will make the case that literacy-numeracy and high school graduation is too narrow an agenda, and that the overemphasis on this cluster of goals squeezes out dealing with the human element of development that I will call ‘connectedness’.

Third I will show how ‘deep learning’ provides the right focus and support to liberate and focus learning in a way that fosters both academic learning, and connected to life—a theme we call ‘engage the world Change the world’. Mobilizing teachers and students is key.

Finally, I will focus on the kind of leaders—called Nuancers—that will be required to lead the complex form of reaction and development that will be necessary to make progress under the conditions of complexity presented in the paper. In particular I will show that nuance leaders experts in understanding and managing ‘context’. Nuance is seeing both the forest and the trees. It is action informed by deep cultural literacy. It is the recognition that every new context automatically ‘de-skills you’. It is leadership that displays both expertise and apprenticeship. It is leadership that solves complex problems jointly with the group.

The bottom line for me is: exploit upward; liberate downward; and verticalize and lateralize everywhere.

Coffee StationFoodShopBookshopMorning Tea & Exhibition Opening

Pre-Function Area Level 3

Trade Exhibition Stands Open.
HarperCollins Australian Banjo Prize Reading
Trade Spotlight Product Demonstration

panelInteractive Keynote Session: Vision & Voice
Panel

Plenary: Grand Ballroom Level 3

The interactive keynote session will further unpack the theme of the conference. The following four experts who will be discussing their experience, research and practice in this area.

Greg Whitby
Jenny Atta
Michele Simons
Tony Cook

Concurrent SessionVision & Voice Day 1 Concurrent Sessions

Plenary: Grand Ballroom Level 3 + Breakout Rooms Level 4

Coffee StationFoodShopBookshopLunch & Exhibition Showcase

Pre-Function Area Level 3

Todd Whitaker Signing & Meet & Greet
Michael Fullan Live Interview & Book Signing
Bookshop Pre-Order & Reserve Station Open

ShowcaseAustralian Showcase

Plenary: Grand Ballroom Level 3 + Breakout Rooms Level 4

Janet Clinton
Erica McWilliam
John Halsey
Tania Aspland


Janet Clinton
Influencing student voice through teacher talk: highlights from the Visible Classroom

Learners who have agency and voice will be able to communicate with others, work collaboratively and adapt to different contexts in a changing society, importantly they will demonstrate flexibility in learning. This paper focuses on the influence of teacher talk on learner agency. Using the extensive Visible Classroom data base of over 1500 lesson transcripts it will be suggested that ‘what we say and how we say it’ impacts student learning.

The Visible Classroom seeks to collect real-time, objective evidence of classroom practice that can be fed back to teachers for reflection and development. Developed by the Melbourne Graduate School of Education and Access Innovation Media (Ai-Media) the Visible Classroom uses mobile phone technology to record teacher practice and capture objective data on teacher talk. Feedback reports are used to provide opportunities for teacher reflection and practice development.

This presentation will provide an overview of the Visible Classroom, it’s key implementation components, applicability to the promotion of learner agency, and evidence of its success in shifting specific teacher practices. A high level summary of findings of factors that influence learner agency will be presented. It is suggested that variability of language across teachers and classrooms may have a differential effect on learners. It is also hypothesized that language-aware teachers will have a greater influence learning.


John Halsey
Re-framing, re-focussing and revitalising education in rural, regional and remote Australia

The key challenge for regional, rural and remote education is ensuring, regardless of location or circumstances, that every young person has access to high quality schooling and opportunities.

There is a diversity of factors, relationships and resources required for a student to learn, successfully complete school and commence a pathway beyond school which is personally rewarding and also makes a contribution to the wider society. In practice, the contexts, factors, relationships and resources that impact on learning and opportunities don’t exist as discrete entities. Their interactions influence the learning, growth and nurturing of students from their early years through to school graduation and beyond.

Much is already being done by individual states and territories and in partnership with the Australian Government to ensure RRR students and families do have access to high quality education and do make a successful transition to further study, training and employment.

However, much remains to be done to bridge the gap between the achievements and opportunities of RRR students and those most commonly associated with their urban counterparts.


Erica McWilliam
First Day, First Class: Initiating highly effective teaching

This Showcase elaborates on empirical research conducted by Erica McWilliam (Adjunct Professor, QUT) and Peter Taylor (Adjunct Professor, Griffith U) into how highly capable teachers establish effective classroom cultures with a new class of students.

The current literature provides lots of anecdotal advice (and a few horror stories!) but little empirical data about this specific issue. The study took up the challenge of identifying effective day one, lesson one practices, some generic and others specific to individuals, Year levels, disciplines, and school types. The Showcase elaborates implications not only for site-specific professional learning in schools but more broadly for the improvement of teaching practice.  

The research was underpinned by the following assumptions:

  1. That highly effective teachers have practices that rely on well-established routines for student behaviour and engagement in their classrooms.
  2. That such teachers understand and/or intuit the difference between ‘good constraints’ and ‘impediments’ when they establish the routines they want students to practise routinely from lesson one, day one.
  3. That while these routines are likely to be nuanced by a range of factors (year level, discipline, classroom ecology) they are crucial to building a classroom learning culture in a systematic and sustainable way. 

The inquiry involved observing, video recording and analysing the practices of a number of teachers (n = 62) who have already been identified as highly effective across 5 different school settings (government, non-government co-ed, and 3 single sex schools). It involved tracking the establishment of enabling practices from the first day, first class, for a least the first two or three lessons with each individual class (over 200 lessons in total).

The Showcase will include video evidence of effective teaching on day one, class one, as well as an invitation to participants to share reflections on key findings and their implications for contemporary teachers and leaders of learning.


Tania Aspland

Professor Tania Aspland is currently Dean and Professor Education Policy and Strategy, at Australian Catholic University. She has been re-elected for a third term as President of the Australian Deans of Education Council 2018-2020. Previously she was Executive Dean of the Faculty of Education and Arts at ACU and before that Professor and Dean of Education at the University of Adelaide. She has been a leader of learning and teaching and curriculum development in higher education and teacher education for many years. Tania Aspland has developed an international reputation for community capacity building in Papua New Guinea, Singapore, Hong Kong, The Philippines, and Vietnam. She has evidenced-based success with action learning as a project-based learning strategy in developing countries. She has also instigated new models of work-integrated learning within schools and universities, to support the process of curriculum development and leadership. The building of a professional portfolio, the centrality of professional attributes, an investigative orientation to learning and a process of student self-auditing are key innovations that are central to the programs.

Coffee StationShopBookshopAfternoon Tea

Pre-Function Area Level 3

keynoteProfessor Douglas Fisher
Keynote Session

Plenary: Grand Ballroom Level 3

Day 1 Close

Pre-Function Area Level 3